Tag Archives: party food

Triple Chocolate Cookies

10 Feb

Triple Chocolate Cookies with Oats
Qty. approx 48

Notes:

You can substitute the cocoa and chocolate more to your tastes, and use candy bars if necessary: Natural for the Dutch-processed cocoa; milk chocolate for the unsweetened, etc.

You can use any kind of chips you like.  These cookies are a good way to empty any open bags of chips laying around.  You can also experiment with the amount of chips you use.

If you’re called away, keep the dough cool (but not frozen) until you can finish the batch.

Dry Ingredients
1¾ c. bread flour
¼ c. AP flour
¼ c. Dutch-processed cocoa
1¾ c. oats
1 c. brown sugar
¼ c. white sugar
1 TBL instant espresso
½ tsp baking powder
2 tsp salt
8 oz. white chocolate chips
8 oz. semisweet chips
4 oz. milk chocolate chips

Wet Ingredients and Fats

2 TBL unsalted butter, melted
6 TBL unsalted butter, softened
2 TBL lard or shortening (lard preferred)
3 eggs
1 egg yolk
2 TBL dark corn syrup
2 TBL vanilla (or to taste)
10 oz. bittersweet chocolate, melted
2 oz. unsweetened chocolate, melted
2 TBL vegetable oil

Preheat oven to 350 F. Place rack in the middle; line room temp baking sheets with parchment.

Begin melting chocolate with 1 TBL of the vegetable oil. This can be done in the microwave, or over direct, very low heat.  Once melted, mix in cocoa and allow to cool.

While you’re at the stove or microwave, heat up a very small amount of water to add to the instant espresso, then set aside.  Then, melt the 2 TBL of butter and set aside to cool. (That’s important!)

While the chocolate is melting, begin assembling the rest of the cookies:

Cream the butter, lard, 1 tsp of the salt and brown sugar in a mixer set to medium.  (Use beater attachments.) This will take about four minutes to fluff up and lighten in color a bit.  If you need to use a hand mixer for this, that’s fine; no need to worry about timing. Everything can sit for a few extra minutes if necessary.

In a separate mixing bowl, mix your room temp eggs, single yolk, white sugar, corn syrup, vanilla, cooled espresso paste, cooled melted butter and last TBL of salt.  (If the butter’s too warm, it’ll cook the eggs.  No joke.)  Use a whisk to incorporate the ingredients, but gently: Do not incorporate air.  If you incorporate too much air, combined with the baking powder your cookies may rise too quickly, the droop and spread.

Allow this mixture to sit for a couple minutes, mix, then repeat once more in another couple minutes.

While the egg mixture sets and activates, assemble the dry ingredients in another bowl: Whisk together flours, oats, baking powder and chips until slightly aerated and well-mixed.  This takes less manpower than you think, so be careful not to overmix.

At this point, you can turn around and mix the egg mixture.  (You’ll notice that the salt has activated the flavors, sugars, and eggs. Another stir helps this along.)  Now, you can incorporate the chocolate into the egg mixture with the same whisk.

Pour the egg/chocolate mixture into the bowl containing the creamed butter and sugar.  Mix this on low until incorporated; about 30 seconds or so.  This will not be a smooth mixture, so again, don’t overmix.

Finally, add the flour/chip mixture.  Use the lowest setting, or mix by hand.  A good rule of thumb?  Your batters and doughs are usually mixed properly well before you think they are.  Overmixing will flatten bakery, making it tough and dense.

Set the dough aside in a cold space to set the dough: About 30 minutes in a freezer, or 1 hour in a fridge or cold mudroom.  AC vents are useful for this in warmer climates, too, but if necessary, you can let the dough set on its own at room temperature for a few hours.  The melted chocolate will take care of this eventually.

Once set, use a 1½ TBL scoop to place 9 to 12 cookies on the pan.  (I always start low in case I’ve done something wrong.)  You’ll want to shape these cookies using either your index and middle fingers, or the bottom of your scoop.

Rotating, parchment and room temp cookie sheets will help ensure that your cookies do not burn.

Bake for 12 minutes, rotating at the 6-minute mark.  You can do these two cookie sheets at a time, too, by using a rack just beneath the middle one.  However, this makes rotating the cookies—turning them around and switching racks—very important.

Repeat until finished, using room temp cookie sheets each time.  You can re-use the parchment each time so you don’t have to wash them.  In fact, I can’t remember the last time I washed my cookie sheets.  But you know what?  What burns never return, my friends.

Please let me know if you have questions, suggestions, or anything else.  Your feedback is important to me!

Advertisements

Baking for Coworkers: Triple Chocolate Cookies

9 Feb

I work in a fairly large department, fully half of which would be happy to have a Food Day every day.  Did someone have a baby?  Food Day!  Is someone going to have a baby someday, maybe?  Food Day!  Did the sun rise in the east and set in the west?  Food Day!  Hey, it’s Boxing Day.  In Canada.  But what the hell: Bust out your Crock Pot®, ‘cause it’s Food Day.

As you would expect from this description, the Super Bowl Big Game set this truly sweet—and hungry—half of the department to work.  The sign-up sheet made the rounds, with plates and napkins of course chosen first by a problematic colleague known as Meat Sweats.  (Do you really want to know?)  Others were left to choose from more complicated requests such as five pounds of nacho cheese, crab or crab-like or sour-cream-and-onion dip, and “NO CHEESE TRAYS, PLEASE.”

Now, it’s perhaps not without reason I sit pretty far away from most of the department.  (I love them–I do!– but I really don’t need to see them or hear them much.)  So when these lists reach me, everything’s usually taken except for, say, fruit fluff and pasta salad, both of which my pride prevents me from even considering.  For Super Bowl Big Game Food Day, I did what I always do: Scribble “bakery” somewhere on the bottom of the page alongside my initials.  No one’s argued with me yet.

What complicated things for me, though, was the preposterous blizzard the belted us the Wednesday just prior to Super Bowl Big Game Food Day.  I usually have a lot of baking supplies on hand, but I hadn’t done much to replenish them since Christmas; I would be damned, though, if I was going to make a trip to the store after shoveling out a quarter of my alley with only two adults and two children.  I’d have to make do with what I had around.

This proved to be easier than I expected, the reason being is that as I’ve mentioned numerous times, there’s only so fancy you can get when baking for your coworkers.  Similar to my Soft, Chewy and Creamy Sugar Cookie, I have in reserve more of my own highly adaptable recipes that allow me to switch our more sophisticated ingredients for less whenever necessary.

For this particular Food Day, I made my Triple Chocolate Cookies with Oats.  I swapped out my usual Penzey’s Dutch-processed cocoa for natural cocoa; used some melted milk chocolate along with an easy semi (all candy bars); and substituted butterscotch chips where I would’ve used chopped dark chocolate in the 80 to 90 percent range, making what resulted in the first better-than-bakery cookies that taste like Cocoa Puffs.  And you know what?  They were a huge success, just like that.

I’ll post the recipe for you tomorrow evening. Be sure to check back then for my foolproof recipe, clear instructions, and tricks and tips to help you bring the best cookies for your next Random Occasion Food Day.

Xmas Baking for the People I Love

8 Dec

Hello again, my nine readers.  How’ve you been?

I’ve obviously been busy with other projects–other writing–but I’ve almost narrowed down the bakery I’ll be giving to my family and closest friends, which is what they’re getting because I have no money to give them anything else.  I mean, because I care.

The trick to giving bakery as gifts is this: Portability.  Your people need to be able to take your bakery home with them. Freeze it. Pack it in a lunch. Clean the tub with pieces of it shoved in their mouths.  Make it rich, make it pretty, and make it small.

So here’s what I’ve got so far.  Let me know what you think:

  • Some kind of cookie bar topped with meringue: Pretty. Will keep well. Interesting mix of textures.
  • Cookies with some sort of spice combo: Chai-ish, I’m thinking, a bit crispy and half-dipped in, I think, 70 percent bittersweet if I can keep the cookies light in color.
  • Fudge: I know an oldster who loves the stuff, but do I stick with chocolate?  I’m thinking butterscotch, with marshmallows and Werther’s bits.  Real sweet tooth, that guy.
  • Brownie cupcakes with mint patties: My recipe, and my amazing frosting, but credit Martha Stewart for the idea.
  • For the office: Bite-size crispie treats with miniature choc chips, dipped in semisweet. Remember, if it’s for the office, keep it simple.
  • For the office: Nutella sandwiches with pretzel crackers, dipped in white chocolate. (Okay, these are already done and they’re amazing.  I guessed on these. I guessed right.)
  • For the office: Brownies, of course.  They’ve been requested. These I’ll make with an easygoing, natural cocoa, though. Nothing challenging.
  • Cigarettes.

I’ll publish what happens, crap and all, as I go along.  Now as for you, I want your thoughts, your ideas, the stuff you’re baking, questions, complaints… whatever you’ve got.  I’ll be waiting with a whip.

Baking on the Cheap

19 Sep

I’ve got a new project.  Now that I’ve thoroughly tested my perfect brownie recipe, I want to find out if holds up under distressed conditions: House-brand cocoa; house-brand, bleached all-purpose flour ; and seriously cheap, house-brand instant coffee.  All I have left to buy is the generic–and yes, imitation–vanilla.  I’ll be using ingredients that are thought to be maybe a half-step better than that stuff that comes in no. 10 cans with a plain white label, which I’d use for this test if I could find it.

Now, I’m certain several tests will be necessary.  House-brand, bleached all-purpose flour has a protein content than can vary not only by the store, but even from batch to batch in the same store.  It will take some work, I suspect, to develop a general rule for baking with it.

Flavors will likely be an issue as well.  Like the flour, house-brand cocoas,vanillas, and instant coffees can vary in flavor and quality, and all within the same store.  It really just depends where the store sources its products from contract to contract. I plan to keep my methods constant, but I’ll develop all new proportions and adjustments with this variance in mind.

See, one of my goals here is to make baking as accessible as possible.  Not just the directions and the science, but the cost, too,  And while I already insist on using ingredients that are easy to find, it’s time to figure out how to bake great things with the ingredients that’ll make your typical food jag laugh at you behind your back.  Let’s show ’em that real skill and confidence–and taste–has nothing to do with name and price.

I can’t wait.

Have You Heard Enough About the Brownies Yet?

12 Sep

No?  Good.  Because there’s more.

Well, not really.  I just made them yesterday, while the bread was rising.  I decided to use up the last of that organic, natural cocoa I was stuck with from my initial test.  Plus, I had a new Dominican-style vanilla to try, which I’ll discuss later.

But, I also made them without the jam, and failed to pour any fruity syrup of any kind over the top because, well, I forgot.  And I forgot to blend the sugar.   Yeah, I was tired.  I never seem to get to these things until, like, 8 ‘o clock at night.

Anyway, they’re still fabulous.  I do still prefer the flavor of dutch-processed cocoa, but seriously, I’ve got no complaints.  And neither does anyone else.

On Food Porn. I Mean, Food Photography

25 Aug

I’ve mentioned before that I don’t have the time to learn how to shoot food in the way that food’s shot these days. You know, expensive camera aside, I don’t have time for retouching and selective focus and that perfectly perfect mess on the plate. Plus, I want to show that food can be made to look as good as it does in those retouched photos. So with me, you get the shots you get.

But according to this Wall Street Journal article, I’m either way ahead of my time, or so far behind it I’ll never have more than nine readers. As food stylist Alison Attenborough says in the article, “people are interested in small butchers, artisan producers, farmer’s markets—a more handmade look.”  See, I just don’t think that’s enough.  Think about it: You remember those shots from old issues of Gourmet? The Julia Child Menu Cookbook? Do you think Martha Stewart serves lopsided cake?  I mean, really.

I’ll give you an example of the problem.  I was in a local bakery recently to find pastries clearly made by someone who has the right touch for it. But the baker stopped short, and I don’t know why: She obviously handled the dough perfectly, but left it looking hamfisted, as though it was destined for a bake sale for the blind.  I understand that this is the trend, but why wouldn’t you want to do more?

So when you’re that close, people, don’t stop. Then you won’t have to touch up your food shots like a Playboy centerfold, and you can save all that Photoshop time for something more important: Making people happy with your bakery–and being the one who can do the very best.

Fruit Swirl Brownie Test No. 3: Flavor Changes

22 Aug

Note:  This is part one of the test results.  Please read about the process changes for more information.

Flavor Changes

In terms of better flavor, my second test was awfully close, but still not quite there.  So I increased the quantity of cocoa and salt, and reduced the amount of sugar by just a bit.  I put the sugar to use as more than just a sweetener instead.

Part process change, part flavor change, I used the sugar as an activator by allowing the sugar to dissolve and rest in the chocolate-egg mixture for a few minutes.  What happens is that the sugar dissolves fully over time in the available moisture—the egg whites, the water content of the butter—and once heated, the sugar carmelizes, in a way, bringing with it a fuller, richer flavor.  Not to mention some very refined edges when it migrates to the sides and surface.  I intend to incorporate this process, well, wherever possible.

As for your cocoa, I still recommend Dutch-processed cocoa.  (With the success of this test, I will now use Penzeys high-fat Dutch-processed cocoa exclusively. It’s just champion and extremely well-priced.)  I still think you can use a natural cocoa if that’s your preference, but you may have to make some allowances for it.  A bit more fat and espresso paste, a bit less vanilla and sugar… these come to mind.

Finally, I have settled on cherry jam for this, but you can use whatever you want to try.    This does present the last remaining flavor issue, though:  The jam’s flavor still doesn’t come through well enough.  It provides great support for the texture, which in turn supports the flavor; but the fruit flavor’s not terribly evident.  I still recommend using it—it’s certainly in the background–but I also now recommend that you heat some up on the stove, then either drizzle it or spread it over the top.  I haven’t tried this yet, but I’m confident in this as a solution.

Please contact me here with questions.  You can find the final recipe here.